When You’re a Parent, There Are Hallways You Can’t Walk for Your Kids

When you’re a parent, there are hallways you can’t walk for your kids.

I’ve walked with a lot- and I mean a lot- of mamas through hard parenting moments. I remind them that God loves those kids more than we ever could. That God wants good for our babies. That he is with them in a bigger way than we can be with them even when we step in and want to fix everything. That he is THE most audacious writer, and his story is always, always good.

But when it’s you, it’s easy to forget your own wisdom.

When you’re standing at one end of this hallway knowing your baby has to walk forward into something that will be painful and change the trajectory of her life. It’s hard to just stand.

Teen pregnancy is crazy town. It’s sad when it’s someone else’s kid because you know it’s going to be hard. But comparing it to a roller coaster when you’re the mama of the soon to be mama is an understatement.

Sometimes there is peace, confidence, even laughter.

But sometimes you have no idea where you stand. Your role is changed in a second, and sooner than expected, you are asked to remain. To let go.

Except you’re the mama.

The mama.

Who loves. Who hurts at times. Who fights through fears. Who remains because YOU know that even though loving these babies is hard, there is no better mom for the job. She is my legacy. Remaining is my legacy. Trusting God and standing firm at the end of this hallway is my legacy.

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This post originally appeared on Facebook, published with permission.


Shontell Brewerhttp://shontellbrewer.com
Shontell Brewer is a wife and mother to her five children, ages 20 to 12. She holds a master’s in divinity with an emphasis in urban ministry. Her most recent project is an arts-integrated prevention curriculum for minors trafficked across the nation. She speaks as a prevention specialist to communities affected by sex trafficking. Find her at ShontellBrewer.com, and on Instagram and Facebook at Shontell Brewer. Her book, Missionary Mom is due fall of 2018.

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